New York Marijuana News

Robert Pederson, 73, of New York, N.Y., was arrested for cannabis trafficking at 2:14 p.m. Nov. 13 on Interstate 80 in the area of mile post 56 in Bureau County.

An Illinois State Police trooper on patrol in Bureau County made a traffic stop on a black 2016 Infinity SUV. During the course of the stop, probable cause was developed to search the vehicle.

The search revealed 16,000 individual cartridges of cannabis oil, with a total weight of 514 pounds, with an estimated value of $224,000.

the holiday online gift auction is open for bidding!

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In the fashion world, while Mata was constantly party-hopping and being offered flutes of champagne as part of her job, she had never smoked weed. Though fashion designers like Jeremy Scott and Alexander Wang has been using the cannabis leaf print in their designs to affect a counterculture appeal, women’s magazines were not yet speaking openly about cannabis in the same way they were speaking about margaritas. Sure, edgy “it” girls like Chloë Sevigny who spoke openly about cannabis were cool, because they didn’t give a fuck—but they were framed as cautionary tales, always flagged with stories of therapy sessions. Back then, it was the only way you could talk about cannabis in New York.

Mata and Gladish. (Drew Bird Photo for Leafly)

But New York has changed. Earlier this year, GQ published an article outing the Green Angels, a cannabis delivery service made of fashion model-turned-messengers (it’s an attractive alternative to bartending or waitressing). In 2015, Refinery29 wrote about GOODWITCH, an underground Brooklyn-based THC lip balm that counts employees at Vera Wang and Vogue as customers. And in July 2017, Vogue-favorite natural beauty retailer CAP Beauty released a CBD-based food supplement called The Daily Hit, promoting it to beauty editors by sending them CBD-laced brownies. (The first batch sold out two days after launch, and of course, it was featured in Vogue.) Former Lucky editor Verena Von Pfetten is also launching Gossamer, a glossy magazine about weed.

So by the time Mata moved to the Bay Area in 2016, she was ready for cannabis culture—and cannabis culture was ready for someone like her. It helped that her husband’s family has a history of cannabis entrepreneurship in Northern California, where he is originally from. Gladish (towering over the petite Mata at 6’1”) had moved to New York City after college

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By Jeff de Nunzio  |  Nov 17, 2017  |  Politics

Brooklyn Law School last week was the epicenter of a growing movement to legalize and regulate recreational marijuana in New York.

The school’s Center for Urban Business Entrepreneurship (CUBE) on November 6 hosted Cannabis Law: From Criminalization to Opportunity, billed by organizers as the largest cannabis policy reform event ever held in New York.

As the seven-member panel of legislators, lawyers, entrepreneurs and advocates weaved through the myriad topics facing the nascent industry, the conversation zeroed in on the socially responsible business practices that could be established within the confines of full legalization and regulation.

“Was there ever an industry better situated to be a for-profit/social impact dual function?” asked CUBE CEO John Rudikoff in his opening remarks.

Read more of the story at The Cannabist. Should the DEA deschedule cannabis? Missing out on all things Civilized?

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On Veterans Day, New York joined a growing list of states that allow post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to be treated with medical marijuana. As a former active-duty soldier suffering from this debilitating disease, I applaud this achievement. Gov. Cuomo has now given thousands of New Yorkers a safe and effective treatment alternative to the opioids and other powerful prescription drugs that PTSD sufferers have been forced to rely on for too long.

This expansion is especially critical in the face of federal rules that continue to block this important treatment on a national level.

I joined the Army while in college, after graduating from high school in Syracuse. Although enrolled on a Marines ROTC scholarship, I felt a calling to serve and signed up for boot camp before finishing my degree. It was following a deployment in Afghanistan that I began experiencing PTSD, a condition that seemed to be triggered after surviving a rocket-propelled grenade attack. The incident left me jumpy, tense and on edge — all hallmark symptoms of PTSD.

This diagnosis came in addition to another significant health incident that occurred during my service — an accident at the end of Basic Training that left me with a serious head injury and frequent seizures. I was able to continue my training and service only by taking prescription medications to manage my condition.

When I returned home from Afghanistan, I was admitted to Walter Reed Army Medical Center and assigned to the Warrior Transition Unit. In my re-entry into civilian life, I was prescribed 13 medications and was taking, at one point, 60 pills a day, none of which were really helping with my pains and PTSD. In addition to the plethora of prescriptions, I was also using drugs and alcohol to self-medicate.

I felt suicidal and there were times

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(WXYZ) – Michigan may be voting on the legalization of recreational use of marijuana in 2018.

Leaders of a statewide campaign to legalize marijuana say they’ve garnered enough votes to put the issue on state ballot next year.

The Committee to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol says it’s gathered more than 100,000 signatures than the 252,523 required by law to get an issue on the Michigan ballot.

However, the group is currently trying to raise an additional $30,000 to pay a signature collection vendor and submit the documents to the state.

They say they’ll hold a press conference in Lansing Nov. 20 before submitting the signatures to the state.

“We have been working hard all summer to collect the more than 250,000 signatures needed to ask voters to approve ending cannabis prohibition in Michigan, and on Monday that phase of the campaign will be complete,” said National Cannabis Industry Association Executive Director Aaron Smith.

The CRMLA wants to make it legal for adults 21 and older to be able to use pot that has safety standards and the ability to bring in tax revenue.

“The people have been far ahead of the politicians when it comes to marijuana reform,” said Josh Hovey, spokesperson of CRMLA.

Just last week, Detroit residents voted in favor of two ballot proposals to ease restrictions on medical marijuana zoning.   

The first proposal required the city to opt into a state law that recognizes licenses for growing, testing, processing, transporting and provision centers. The second proposal expands the zones for medical marijuana facilities to operate. It also removes distance restrictions for dispensaries in proximity to day care centers, liquor stores, parks or arcades.

The proposals replace Detroit’s current strict medical marijuana ordinance the City Council approved in 2016, which has led to the closing of nearly

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by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director November 15, 2017

African Americans in the city of Buffalo (population 257,000) are disproportionately arrested for low-level marijuana possession offenses, according to an analysis of arrest data by the advocacy group Partnership for the Public Good.

Researchers evaluated marijuana arrest data for Erie County, New York for the years 2012 to 2016. Countywide, blacks comprised 71 percent of all low-level marijuana offenders, despite comprising only 13.5 percent of the population. In the city of Buffalo, 86 percent of those arrested for minor marijuana possession violations were either African American (80 percent) or Hispanic (six percent). Blacks and Hispanic represent fewer than 50 percent of the city’s population.

“[T]he disparities in the number of marijuana possession arrests cannot be explained by a higher use among black or Hispanic people,” authors concluded. “Legalizing marijuana would reduce low-level drug arrests by ten percent, and help reduce racial disparities in overall arrest numbers.”

Recent analyses from other states, such as New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, have similarly identified racial disparities in marijuana possession arrests. Nationwide, African Americans are approximately four times more likely than whites to be arrested for possessing marijuana, despite members of both ethnicities using the substance at similar rates.

Full text of the report, “Advancing Racial Equity and Public Health: Smarter Marijuana Laws in Western New York,” appears online here.

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New York is one of the most liberal states in America, and yet it’s remained relatively behind the times when it comes to marijuana. But could that soon be coming to an end?

The Brooklyn Law School recently held an event to discuss the possibility of New York state legalizing marijuana in the near-future. One of the guests at the event was State Senator Liz Krueger, who argued that with several other states nearby legalizing marijuana (Maine and Massachusetts) and with more possibly on the way (New Jersey), it’s time for New York to jump on board as well.

“We see our neighboring states legalize, we see the economics escaping us,” said Krueger, whose district 28 stretches along Manhattan’s Upper East Side. “You just see other states going down this road, and the world didn’t end out in Colorado.”

In June, Krueger introduced a bill to legalize marijuana throughout the state, but it’s currently stuck in committee. Krueger’s attempted to pass similar bills twice in the path, but both efforts died.

Despite New York’s liberal reputation, the state’s been rather conservative when it comes to marijuana laws. In 2016, the state launched a limited medical marijuana program that only allowed patients with cancer, AIDS, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease to participate. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo added chronic pain in March and on Saturday included PTSD to honor Veteran’s Day. In addition, the state’s medical marijuana law only allows non-smokable forms of cannabis to be used. 

The big roadblock to recreational marijuana in New York is Cuomo. The two-term governor has made it clear he opposes legalizing recreational marijuana while he’s still in office. He’s already declared his intent to run for a third-term next fall, and it’s hard to believe anyone would be able to unseat him either in a primary or the

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Gov. Cuomo signed a law on Nov. 11 adding PTSD to the list of conditions that can now be treated with medical marijuana. Natasha Vaughn, Albany Bureau

Gov. Andrew Cuomo spoke in Manhattan on Nov. 4, 2017, before the Veteran’s Day parade to announce PTSD will be a condition eligible for medical marijuana in New York.(Photo: Governor’s office)

ALBANY — New Yorkers who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder will now be able to use medical marijuana as a form of treatment.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a law Saturday that added PTSD to the list of conditions eligible for medical marijuana in New York.

“As of today, marijuana will be legalized if a doctor authorizes and finds the condition of PTSD for a veteran, and I think that can help thousands of veterans. It’s something that we’ve been talking about for a long time, and I’m glad we’re taking action,” Cuomo said.

REVENUE: Money woes hamper New York’s medical marijuana program

LAWSUIT: NY medical marijuana companies sue over expansion plan

STRUGGLES: Progress and hurdles for NY’s medical marijuana program

Often associated with military veterans, PTSD is medical disorder that can occur after a person experiences, witnesses or was threatened by something traumatic, life-threatening or violent, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

Symptoms can include nightmares, flashbacks, aggression, intrusive thoughts, distress and insomnia, the group said. It also can be found in firefighters, police officers, survivors of rape, domestic violence and accidents, experts said.

New York is now the 23rd state to allow PTSD to qualify to be treated with medical marijuana.

After a sluggish start, New York’s medical marijuana program has expanded the conditions eligible to receive the drug and the number of medical

Read More Here...

CLOSE

Gov. Cuomo signed a law on Nov. 11 adding PTSD to the list of conditions that can now be treated with medical marijuana. Natasha Vaughn, Albany Bureau

ALBANY — New Yorkers who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder will now be able to use medical marijuana as a form of treatment.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a law Saturday that added PTSD to the list of conditions eligible for medical marijuana in New York.

“As of today, marijuana will be legalized if a doctor authorizes and finds the condition of PTSD for a veteran, and I think that can help thousands of veterans. It’s something that we’ve been talking about for a long time, and I’m glad we’re taking action,” Cuomo said.

REVENUE: Money woes hamper New York’s medical marijuana program

LAWSUIT: NY medical marijuana companies sue over expansion plan

STRUGGLES: Progress and hurdles for NY’s medical marijuana program

Often associated with military veterans, PTSD is medical disorder that can occur after a person experiences, witnesses or was threatened by something traumatic, life threatening or violent, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

Symptoms can include nightmares, flashbacks, aggression, intrusive thoughts, distress and insomnia, the group said. It can also be found in firefighters, police officers, survivors of rape, domestic violence and accidents, experts said.

New York is now the 23rd state to allow PTSD to qualify to be treated with medical marijuana.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo spoke in Manhattan on Nov. 4, 2017, before the Veteran’s Day parade to announce PTSD will be a condition eligible for medical marijuana in New York. (Photo: Governor’s office)

After a sluggish start, New York’s medical marijuana program has expanded the conditions eligible to receive the drug and the number of medical professionals

Read More Here...

Live BriefingBy NICHOLAS FANDOS, MATT APUZZO and CHARLIE SAVAGENovember 14, 2017

• Attorney General Jeff Sessions, testifying before the House Judiciary Committee, showed selective recall on the Trump campaign’s Russia contacts.

• Mr. Sessions said he had “no reason to doubt these women” who have accused the man who wants his old Senate seat, Roy S. Moore, of seeking sexual or romantic favors from them as teenagers.

• Mr. Sessions was asked about his direction that the department consider a special counsel to investigate Mr. Trump’s political opponents, including Hillary Clinton.

The Run-UpThe podcast that makes sense of the most delirious stretch of the 2016 campaign.Sessions: I don’t recall Russia reports, but I shot down Trump-Putin meeting.

Mr. Sessions denied that he lied in October when he testified that he knew of nobody in the Trump campaign who had contacts with Russians during the presidential campaign. “And I don’t believe it happened,” he said.

Court records later revealed that Mr. Sessions led a March 2016 meeting in which George Papadopoulos, a campaign aide, discussed his Russian ties and suggested setting up a meeting between Mr. Trump. and Vladimir V. Putin, the Russian president.

“I had no recollection of this meeting until I saw these news reports,” Mr. Sessions said.

Mr. Sessions testified Tuesday that was still hazy on the details about what Mr. Papadopoulos had proposed.

But on one matter, he said his memory is clear: he said he shot down Mr. Papadopoulos’ idea of a Trump-Putin meeting. And he said he told Mr. Papadopoulos that he was not authorized to represent the campaign in such discussions.

To sum up: Mr. Sessions said he could not remember much about Russian influence on the Trump campaign, except when he could block such influence.

Applying the Sessions standard on perjury to … Jeff Sessions.

As Democrats repeatedly put heat on Mr. Sessions over the evolution of his testimony before

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